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Author Taps North Carolina Lore

Author Scott Nicholson of Boone, N.C., has tapped regional events in his latest novel of supernatural suspense, “The Home.”

Nicholson’s new novel was inspired by the tragic death of a child at a group home in Banner Elk, N.C., in 1999. The nine-year-old boy died after being placed in a restraint hold by one of the group home’s staff members, and as a reporter, Nicholson was able to follow the story and subsequent trial.

The idea simmered for several years before Nicholson put it to paper. “The event served as inspiration, but I built my own story around it,” he said. “I decided to create a character named Freeman Mills who has telepathy and manic depression. The telepathy was caused by painful experiments Freeman underwent when he was very young, and he is sent to a group home where the experiments are still underway.”

Nicholson also explored the phenomena of EMF fluctuations in his novel. Paranormal enthusiasts, or “ghost hunters,” often measure electromagnetic fields to detect supernatural activity, believing fluctuations in the field are caused by the presence of ghosts. Nicholson turned the idea around so the use of strong EMFs in his fictional experiments actually attract the ghosts.

“The scientists are using electromagnetic fields to heal mental disorders, but the experiments have unexpected side effects,” Nicholson said. “They attract the ghosts of the patients who died in the facility back when it was an insane asylum. What’s strange is that the fictional experiments I used in the book are now being explored by real scientists.”

Nicholson has written three other novels based in the North Carolina mountains. His first, “The Red Church,” was a finalist for the Bram Stoker Award and an alternate selection of the Mystery Guild. It was inspired by a haunted church near his home. His novel “The Harvest” is a tale of alien infection and in “The Manor,” Nicholson used the Cone Manor on the Blue RidgeParkway as the fictional setting for a haunted artists’ retreat.

Nicholson has worked as a journalist, painter, musician, dishwasher, carpenter, and baseball card merchant. His website at www.hauntedcomputer.com contains fiction, writing advice, and an online journal.

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High-resolution color author photograph available at http://www.hauntedcomputer.com/media12.htm

For more information, access the online press kit at http://www.hauntedcomputer.com/media.htm or contact Scott Nicholson at publicist AT hauntedcomputer.com

This release is uncopyrighted and may be freely published or distributed. To learn more about the book, visit its official webpage

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